Learnallpro reports that probably because of the enticing three-year study period as opposed to the Nigerian four-year minimum, the ostensibly ‘cheap’ education, and the near-constant power supply.

READ ALSO: Toughest courses to Study in the World 2022

However, many Nigerians who went to the Benin Republic to study returned to Nigeria after a year or two of study, and I am one of them; others graduated and ended up regretting wasting three years of their lives simply because they were ignorant of a few facts.

With the stress of Jamb and Post UME, many Nigerian students have decided to simply hop over to other countries to get their university degrees, and Benin Republic’s private universities are a popular choice.

Probably because of the enticing three-year study period as opposed to the Nigerian four-year minimum, the ostensibly ‘cheap’ education, and the near-constant power supply.

However, many Nigerians who went to the Benin Republic to study returned to Nigeria after a year or two of study, and I am one of them; others graduated and ended up regretting wasting three years of their lives simply because they were ignorant of a few facts. As a result, I decided to compile a list of five reasons why studying in the Benin Republic isn’t the best option for you.

1. The Disputed Certificate
Due to questionable standards, many Nigerian graduates from private universities in Benin Republic find it difficult to find work in Nigeria after studying there. They also face challenges when pursuing higher education in Nigeria and other developed countries.

I personally know a girl who graduated from a private university in Benin Republic and applied for a master’s degree at the University of Lagos but was denied despite having a Second Class Result.

2. It Isn’t Really Cheap
Sure, they’ll tell you how much cheaper it is than Nigerian private universities, but when you factor in the extremely poor quality of education and structure, you’ll realize you’re paying far too much for far too little.

Even when the exchange rate was supposed to be favorable to Nigerians, after converting your Naira to CEFA, you will be surprised at the CEFA’s poor purchasing power.

Aside from school fees, you’ll have to pay either a hostel fee, which is usually too expensive and crappy, or do what the majority of the students there do. Pay for a room, which is far too expensive considering you’ll be paying not only for the room but also a caution fee that you’ll never get back.

3. Educational Vulnerabilities
One of the strangest things I saw in Benin Republic was students entering the second year without any special qualifications, merely paying a lecturer about fifty thousand naira, or how students with only three credits in their WAECs were admitted without a hitch.

They, the private universities, had very little educational structure, and what they did have was extremely fluid and easily manipulated by anyone.

There will be quite a few students there who ‘transferred’ from one university to another without transcripts, and the student will have an admission letter that portrays the student as having only ever been in that school and grades created and entered into the book for exams that the person wasn’t even in the school for.

4. The Lack of a Social Life
Almost every young Nigerian dreams of attending university, making a lot of friends, and being a part of a thriving university social community.

If these are your plans, and you intend to study in Benin Republic, I recommend you reconsider. I’m aware of several private universities there with three or four people in each department.

A large department may have more than thirty students, and a significant number of these students have ‘transferred without transcripts’ or’skipped’ classes. Not only is their demography unremarkable, but the buildings are typically small and reminiscent of a small JAMB tutorial center.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.