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Echo the lyrebird is caught mimicking the ear-piercing cry of a human baby

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Echo the lyrebird is caught mimicking the ear-piercing cry of a human baby during lockdown – with zookeepers believing he picked up the sound from visiting guests

  • Echo the lyrebird at Sydney’s Taronga Zoo was filmed mimicking a baby’s cry
  • Lyrebirds can imitate various sounds such as chainsaws, people and alarms
  • Footage shows the bird shrieking a similar ear-piercing cry to that of a child 










Incredible footage has captured a lyrebird perfectly mimicking the ear-piercing cry of a human baby.

Echo, who lives at Sydney’s Taronga Zoo, was filmed shrieking and wailing in an alarmingly similar imitation of a child this week.

The zoo said Echo had the ability to mimic a variety of common sounds and a baby’s cry was just one of his many talents.

The Superb Lyrebird is found around Australia’s south-east and has become famous for its uncanny skill of mimicking everyday sounds from car horns and fire alarms to chainsaws.

Leanne Golebiowski, the unit supervisor of birds at Taronga Zoo, said seven-year-old Echo started showing off his baby cry around a year ago.

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‘I can only assume that he picked it up from our guests. Obviously he has been working on his craft during lockdown. But this concerns me, as I thought the zoo was a happy place for families to visit!’ She told The Guardian

The bird named Echo who lives at Sydney's popular Taronga Zoo was filmed shrieking and wailing in an alarmingly similar imitation of a human child

The bird named Echo who lives at Sydney’s popular Taronga Zoo was filmed shrieking and wailing in an alarmingly similar imitation of a human child

‘There are two other sounds that he makes at the moment which he has newly learned. 

‘One is the sound of a power drill which is scarily accurate – the second is our fire alarm. He even has the ‘evacuate now’ announcement down pat.’ 

Upon sharing footage of Echo’s imitations on Facebook, hundreds of other Aussies said they’d seen lyrebirds perform various sounds from their own backyards.

‘We have them in our bush backyard. I have heard the FaceTime ring a few times. As well as magpie calls, chainsaws, fox calls and the alarm from a nearby commercial property that constantly goes off,’ one woman commented.

‘I have also heard one imitating two men talking and laughing,’ another said.

‘They literally mimic everything from a boat motor, a chainsaw, the call of goats, horses and all birds,’ wrote another user.

Others joked the zoo should play some more soothing music for Echo to mimic. 

The Superb Lyrebird is found around Australia's south-east and has become famous for its uncanny skill of mimicking everyday sounds from car horns, fire alarms, chainsaws and even people

The Superb Lyrebird is found around Australia’s south-east and has become famous for its uncanny skill of mimicking everyday sounds from car horns, fire alarms, chainsaws and even people

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